Step mashing UK/US malts?

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Ancient Abbey
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Step mashing UK/US malts?

Postby Ancient Abbey » Sat Jan 30, 2016 11:43 am

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Re: Step mashing UK/US malts?

Postby Brandon » Sat Jan 30, 2016 1:40 pm

Indeed! We have some rich German brewing, farming and food culture in our area. As well as the Hessian soldiers hired by the Brits to fight against the colonists....oops. :)
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Re: Step mashing UK/US malts?

Postby lhommedieu » Sat Jan 30, 2016 9:41 pm

Great story. An article about Wagner states that the advent of the Clipper Ship allowed Germans to bring yeast quickly to the United States, thereby improving the yeasts' chances of survival in an era prior to refrigeration.
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Re: Step mashing UK/US malts?

Postby bjanat » Thu Feb 04, 2016 5:37 am

I think this one covers it https://byo.com/mead/item/1497-the-scie ... ep-mashing


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Re: Step mashing UK/US malts?

Postby Bryan R » Thu Feb 04, 2016 8:01 am





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Re: Step mashing UK/US malts?

Postby bjanat » Thu Feb 04, 2016 8:12 am

I was blown away by the use of the word "science" in the headline . But it would be good to find out the difference here, not that convinced that 10.5% protein pilsner malt needs such different treatment 9.5% Maris Otter, but I could be wrong. What about bohemian pilsner malt?


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Re: Step mashing UK/US malts?

Postby Bryan R » Thu Feb 04, 2016 8:34 am

Ok so... No malt we can get today NEEDS any step mashing. Infact no one should ever even seek it. It would be a pain to work with, have a incredibly short shelf life, and the triple decoction schedule would be your best friend, which is certainly not a good thing.

A step mash is used for achieving the proper attenuation COUPLED with the proper mouthfeel. However there are many ways to achieve this.




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Re: Step mashing UK/US malts?

Postby Weizenberg » Thu Feb 04, 2016 7:42 pm

Of course you can step mash them. I would even argue that you should. I step mash British ales all the time and the Brits are very appreciative.

After all, you are making sugars and that's where the influence of the mash stops.

There is that lovely bit of control on EVG one gets in the 58-65C Range. Then there Is the extra Glycoproteids at rests of at least 60 minutes at 70-72C. It also allows for better adjustments for seasonal fluctuations. Malt needs a certain level of work if you want to have a good starting point.

After that it's all about fermentation. That's a bit like mashing too. Different approaches yield substantially different results.

I find it simpler to adjust a step mash. There is absolutely not reason why you cannot do this with local malts. I'd actually favour this approach because it's more in the spirit of brewing where the fruits of the terroir are fully appreciated.

If us malt has a faster conversion rate, then the timings may need adjusting a little.

Is certainly very possible and even desirable to make the best of what's available nearby.
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Re: Step mashing UK/US malts?

Postby Brody » Thu Feb 04, 2016 10:11 pm

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Re: Step mashing UK/US malts?

Postby Weizenberg » Fri Feb 05, 2016 3:25 am

I'd dough in at 62C and indeed rest there for 30 minutes, then up to 72 for 60 or 70 minutes even. Mash out at 77C would be classic.

I found that the impact on mash is relatively small when compared with grain bill and fermentation. It's wise to adapt these to the desired outcome as well.
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