Hefeweizen

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Smellyglove
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Smellyglove » Thu Mar 09, 2017 2:23 pm

TheHairyHop wrote:wouldn't a pH reading be a good place to go next?


Yes. I need to get another one, didn't store the one I currently have properly.
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Weizenberg
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Weizenberg » Thu Mar 09, 2017 3:13 pm

Bit hard to say without seeing the full brewsheet.

It is not uncommon for wheat beers to have a pause and then suddenly turn and continue a bit further. Usually this happens in the bottle, so not everyone notices it.

Did you do a FFT on a stir-plate?
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Smellyglove » Thu Mar 09, 2017 3:33 pm

Weizenberg wrote:Bit hard to say without seeing the full brewsheet.

It is not uncommon for wheat beers to have a pause and then suddenly turn and continue a bit further. Usually this happens in the bottle, so not everyone notices it.

Did you do a FFT on a stir-plate?


No, didn't do a FFT. But I've never ever seen this behaviour before in either 380 or 300. It's about 20 batches. What draws me towards infection is the drop in SG, and the taste. The lack of face-punching esters and phenolics, as opposed to how they usually turn out, is a mystery. They usually sit for no more than 14 days, as I want them fresh and kegged with as much suspended yeast as possible. This one sat longer.
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Smellyglove » Tue Mar 14, 2017 7:55 am

Another question. This time about speise. I've never done this before and want to try it.

I'm thinking about adding the speise to my keg, and then fill the fermenting beer (a few pts from target final gravity) on top of that, and then carb the keg that way. A few questions comes to mind. If I add the speise with the lid on the keg open (I've always done a closed loop when filling kegs), will the yeast scavenge all the oxygen? I will spund the keg in room temperature, my spunding valve goes up to 1 bar. Can I set the keg cold after a week, and then read the head pressure in the spunding valve at a given temperature?

Is this a stupid idea? I will eventually CPF into bottles.
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Ancient Abbey
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Ancient Abbey » Tue Mar 14, 2017 8:49 am

I've not noticed a difference between speise and simply transferring with 1-1.5% extract remaining. Either way, you're relying on the primary yeast to continue fermentation and conditioning. Krausening will add fresh, healthy yeast to the mix to aid reaching terminal gravity and cleaning up any intermediate compounds, e.g., diacetyl, acetaldehyde, and is ideal for carbonating in the keg.

The primary reason to spund is to remove all the oxygen in the keg. It will also add a little extra energy to your yeast to let them finish the ferment more efficiently.

You will notice a lot more yeast in the keg with this method, enough to make one consider umdrucken to avoid lysis and lipid off-flavors down the road.
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Smellyglove
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Smellyglove » Tue Mar 14, 2017 10:42 am

Ancient Abbey wrote:I've not noticed a difference between speise and simply transferring with 1-1.5% extract remaining. Either way, you're relying on the primary yeast to continue fermentation and conditioning. Krausening will add fresh, healthy yeast to the mix to aid reaching terminal gravity and cleaning up any intermediate compounds, e.g., diacetyl, acetaldehyde, and is ideal for carbonating in the keg.

The primary reason to spund is to remove all the oxygen in the keg. It will also add a little extra energy to your yeast to let them finish the ferment more efficiently.

You will notice a lot more yeast in the keg with this method, enough to make one consider umdrucken to avoid lysis and lipid off-flavors down the road.


Yes, but Krausening means I have to tend to more yeast, it's just about logistics by now, so that's why I was thinking about speise. I'll cool the beer after fermentation in keg is done, and CPF them to bottles, I guess that would leave some yeast at the keg, if not, I'll chop of the diptupe so it doesn't go all the way to the bottom (next time).

But, is this a dumb idea? Will the yeast scavenge the oxygen when it starts to munch on the speise?

Edit: Wait! Can't I just add the speise directly to the fermenter, just before transfering, and then do a classic closed loop transfer? Means opening the lid of the fermenter, but I don't think that contact time with O2 would be detrimental.

Second edit: I thought this actually was a technique for "enhancing" the flavor of the beer. I've been googling and what I've found mostly is that it's just "easier" for some people/breweries. I guess I can try it, but, for me it's easier to just transfer to keg as normal after fermentation is done..
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Weizenberg
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Weizenberg » Wed Mar 15, 2017 7:06 am

Yeast is an excellent anti-oxidant, provided it is fresh and healthy.

It will scavenge any O2 in the headspace before it can do any noticeable damage.

Have a look at this index. You should consider investing in this book. https://www.vlb-berlin.org/sites/defaul ... ontent.pdf
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Smellyglove » Thu Mar 23, 2017 3:55 pm

I'm back, with another question. Since this is my first "run" of trying to nail a proper hefeweizen there's still some discoveries as i go down that road.

The last two batches I've been doing an open fermentation and closed the lid when I see the krausen is retracting. My first one did end up with a small sour sting, this one too, it's a bit acidic, more so than what I'm used to. If we keep a possible lacto-infection out, can this be because of the open fermentation? I guess it's not, but if anyone has experienced the same your input is welcome.

My second thought is that I should start over with a fresh pack of yeast. How many generations do you guys use these strains for? It was great the third generation, but it has gone downwards after that, I'm on my fifth, or sixt (lazy notes).
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Weizenberg
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Weizenberg » Thu Mar 23, 2017 5:30 pm

You can just rest the lid gently on the bucket or use large blow-off tubes. For e.g. Schneider has sterile air filters installed, and avoids having a lot of people traffic near their vats.

As of day 2 regular skimming is a good idea too.

It depends how well you understand yeast management. If you don't then it's probably a good idea refreshing it every 3-4 generation. FYI Augustiner refresehes after every 2nd re-pitch.
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Smellyglove
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Smellyglove » Thu Mar 23, 2017 6:25 pm

2nd repitch. Wow, that's a lot earlier than I would think.

I have close to zero visible gunk surfacing, but if I find any I skim it off. I ferment in a cleaned/chlorine-sanitized fridge for every batch. I guess my yeast has gone bad somewhere down the line. I'll give the current strain one more try with the lid on. Even though I highly doubt this is the culprit, I still want do do it just to cross off open fermentation/0 pressure. The yeast smells great straight from my jar, but tastewise, not so much.

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