Help making Kloster Kreuzberg Dunkel

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Cavpilot2000
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Re: Help making Kloster Kreuzberg Dunkel

Postby Cavpilot2000 » Fri Mar 31, 2017 12:51 pm

Bryan R wrote:How big/modern in their brewhouse? It looks slightly hazy as well so is it safe to say they don't filter? All this matters in recipe formulation.

Correct. All of their beers are unfiltered.

They mention mash being almost 3 hours, a two hour boil, fermenting at 10C and a diacetyl rest. It also sounds like they spund (from my interpretation of their literature below)..

The following information was pulled from their website and translated through Google Translate (my German is improving, but isn't good enough yet):
In the mash pan, the malt is mixed with the brewing water. The mash is then gradually heated. For almost three hours it is intermixed, in order to dissolve the otherwise difficultly soluble malt components.
In the lauter tun the solid components (marc) are then separated from the wort. The mixture is subsequently boiled for two hours at the end of the hops. During this process, water evaporates until the desired master wort is reached. The more malt one admits, the stronger the beer. For 100 liters of beer approx. 17kg of malt is needed. A wort with 12.5% of the original wort produces a beer with about 5 vol.% Alc.
After boiling, the wort is clarified and cooled: For this purpose, these are pumped tangentially into the whirlpool at high speed. This results in a rotation of the entire contents, which compresses the coarse solids in the jacuzzi center to form a compact trub conical.
The wort is then cooled to 6 ° C. by means of a plate cooler, aerated and the yeast is added.
During cooling, hot water is generated in the countercurrent, which is stored for the folgerud.
After fermentation, the fermentation begins. For 100 liters of beer approx. 0.5 liters of thick-pulpy yeast are added. This corresponds to about 15-20 billion yeast cells per liter!

The fermentation takes place at 10 ° C for one week, the upper fermentation takes place at 22 ° C and lasts 3 days.
After only 24 hours, a compact foam blanket, the so-called crimples, has formed into the base components. The yeast builds the malt extract into alcohol and carbonic acid. This also results in heat and the young beer has to be cooled.
The beer flavor is determined by the choice of the yeast strain, the temperature profile, the oxygen content and the added amount of yeast.

The progress of the fermentation is monitored daily. The colder the temperature, the slower the course.
At the end of the main fermentation, the beer is cooled back. The top fermenting yeast rises to the surface of the beer while the bottom fermenting yeast settles on the bottom of the fermentation vessel.
The yeast is harvested for the next brew.
Now the Jungbier can be spent in the storage cellar.

Four tanks with a capacity of 5000 liters and two vats with a capacity of 7000 liters are constantly occupied during the summer months.
The ripening of the beer follows the fermentation.
Optimum storage temperature is 0 ° C.
The storage tanks are under pressure. This naturally enriches the beer with the resulting carbonic acid. The bigger the pressure, the more sparkling the beer. The Braumner says to review!
A large portion of the yeast settles by sedimentation. A small portion, however, remains in the beer and produces a fine yeast turbidity.
The beer must mature for four to six weeks.
The Christmas bock is stored for a quarter of a year!
Until 1954 was only cooled with snow and ice:
For this purpose the oak-wood storage drums were packed with snow and ice in the winter months.
In the underground vaults, the snow lasted until the late summer months.
This allowed cool beer to be served on the warm days.

For more details, check out our history!

1000 hectoliters of beer ripen here on average, in complete peace for the tasteful completion.
Directly from the storage tank, without further treatment, the beer reaches the filler under pressure. This overpressure is necessary so that the carbonic acid in the beer does not release and the beer foams.
The beer is carefully filled into the barrels.

Before the filler, the beer can be examined again at the Schauglas.
Eyeglass
As before, the barrels are filled with bavarian barrels (party barrels) for private use (see picture on the left).

Since 1998 KEG barrels have also been used for gastronomic and festive events (picture right).
Techbrau
German Brewing
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Re: Help making Kloster Kreuzberg Dunkel

Postby Techbrau » Wed Apr 05, 2017 10:31 pm

It's entirely possible that they don't brew it low oxygen. I've had beer from small breweries in Germany that were definitely not brewed low oxygen.
If you always do what you've always done, then you'll always get what you've always gotten.
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Cavpilot2000
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Re: Help making Kloster Kreuzberg Dunkel

Postby Cavpilot2000 » Thu Apr 06, 2017 7:14 am

Techbrau wrote:It's entirely possible that they don't brew it low oxygen. I've had beer from small breweries in Germany that were definitely not brewed low oxygen.

I suspect they don't. Being a Kloster, I think they adhere more to traditional techniques.
But, since my processes are now adjusting to low O2, I'll probably try to do it that way anyway. Now that I've done (only) two low O2 batches, I feel like the process is no big deal anymore and doesn't add any real work and not much extra time.
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Ancient Abbey
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Re: Help making Kloster Kreuzberg Dunkel

Postby Ancient Abbey » Thu Apr 06, 2017 8:34 am

It can be difficult to get beers dark enough brewing LODO, especially if you prefer pima as your base over muma. Sourcing Sinamar made all the difference.
- The best do the basics better -
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Cavpilot2000
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Re: Help making Kloster Kreuzberg Dunkel

Postby Cavpilot2000 » Thu Apr 06, 2017 9:18 am

Ancient Abbey wrote:It can be difficult to get beers dark enough brewing LODO, especially if you prefer pima as your base over muma. Sourcing Sinamar made all the difference.


Yeah, I've considered trying to get Sinamar or just using like an ounce of carafa late in the mash so as to get color but not pick up the flavor.
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Bilsch
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Re: Help making Kloster Kreuzberg Dunkel

Postby Bilsch » Thu Apr 06, 2017 2:41 pm

I've purchased sinamar from Midwest not too long ago and their site says it's still available.

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