Why are you using a DO meter

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bjanat
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Re: Why are you using a DO meter

Postby bjanat » Mon Mar 20, 2017 2:32 am

lupulus wrote:Nico, when you have a few mins, can you describe the parts of your agitator? No hurry. One day, I would like to check how it works compared to recirculation.
Cheers,

I remember he shared before, if you click on related products here you can find the parts.
http://www.hobbybrauerversand.de/navi.p ... 2&lang=eng
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Weizenberg
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Re: Why are you using a DO meter

Postby Weizenberg » Mon Mar 20, 2017 6:14 am

lupulus wrote:Nico, when you have a few mins, can you describe the parts of your agitator? No hurry. One day, I would like to check how it works compared to recirculation.
Cheers,


It is not substantially different from what you may have seen from people in Germany or on Hobbybrauer.

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I use a 12V motor delivering between 15-20 Nm torque, a PWM Control Controller 25Khz (these are cheap, ~£3.50), a flexible shaft coupling and bearings.

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You don't need bearings and a flexible shaft coupling. A stiff coupling is fine as well.

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Try this guy for complete solutions

https://www.brauhardware.de
The Quest for Edelstoff - http://edelstoffquest.wordpress.com
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lupulus
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Re: Why are you using a DO meter

Postby lupulus » Mon Mar 20, 2017 7:59 am

Thanks

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Brody
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Re: Why are you using a DO meter

Postby Brody » Mon Mar 20, 2017 10:11 am

Appreciate the input.

Between slowly doughing in, manually stirring during the raises, checking temps manually, & slowly lifting pounds of wet grain it's definitely a manual labor intensive brew day. But good to know I'm not necessarily killing my beer with O2 in the process. I should note that a more casual approach to BIAB led to higher figures on older brew days.

A couple other potential BIAB problem areas:

1) Wort Haze: I do have turbid wort going into the brew kettle but a long (and manual of course) whirlpool allows me to transfer fairly clear into fermentation. IIRC Nico stated that the big brewers sometimes transfer turbid wort into the Boil Kettle so I fear that less if so.

2) Lauter Stress: Stress caused during the bag lift concerns me. But as someone previously mentioned it's probably gentler than a mash filter. And maybe offset by the lack of pump stress.

I used 50ppm SMS and also used Brew Tan B (was planning on adding in AA but the LHBS didn't carry) so we'll see how it turns out.
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ParanoidAndroid
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Re: Why are you using a DO meter

Postby ParanoidAndroid » Mon Mar 20, 2017 10:16 am

Brody wrote:IMG_6155.JPGI'm in the midst of a helles brew day at the moment. Lately something that's been on my mind is how much more aggressive is a single vessel BIAB style lauter and dough in than a duel vessel/pumped/underlet setup.

For dough in I use a stainless steel scoop and take my time gently adding the grain to the kettle.
For lautering I get up on a chair and very slowly lift the bag out. There is some light dripping of course during the final hoist.

I just pulled a sample pre-boil for taste, pH, and gravity and decided to stick my freshly calibrated extech DO meter in it. It stablized at 0.31mg/l (post lauter and jostled around a bit).

You guys tell me - does this allow me to conclude that, while it's a pain in the ass to do gently, a careful single vessel lauter does not introduce a detrimental amount of O2? Or are these meters suspect enough at low levels that I can't conclude anything?


My process is the same as yours. I haven't installed an underlet system yet on my single pot. I just get to strike temp (after yeast/dextrose de-aerating), then slowly and gently toss the grain in. One thing I have noticed is that the grains sink way faster since I've started doing the LODO-ish process. I'm guessing it's a function of the no-O2 water and conditioning with water/SMB. I do 3.0 gallon batches so there isn't as much malt to mash in. I'm also all ales.
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Weizenberg
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Re: Why are you using a DO meter

Postby Weizenberg » Mon Mar 20, 2017 4:29 pm

Best is to mill straight into the MT if you can.

Can't you just drain the pot via a valve? That should avoid the lifting.

Turbidity of wort usually has a value of 50 EBC (source Narziss/Back).

Speaking of which, my 'update' to a trusted friend arrived today :D

I have fond memories of my first readings. I learned my first classic cold fermentation from this work.

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Prosit!
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Ancient Abbey
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Re: Why are you using a DO meter

Postby Ancient Abbey » Mon Mar 20, 2017 4:31 pm

Weizenberg wrote:Speaking of which, my 'update' to a trusted friend arrived today :D

I have fond memories of my first readings. I learned my first classic cold fermentation from this work.

IMG_20170320_201931.jpg

Prosit!


:tu
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