Making Sauermalt

Discuss malts, hops, and yeast, not related to a specific recipe

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Ancient Abbey
German Brewing
Posts: 1163
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 8:23 pm

Making Sauermalt

Postby Ancient Abbey » Thu Oct 20, 2016 9:51 pm

I sent a note to Best Malts about making sauermalt. Here is their response:

"The BEST Acidulated Malt is being produced like described below:

Ready kilned Pilsen malt is steeped again in an extra vessel heatable up to 50°C ( 122° F) for another 24-48 h (it belongs to the content of lactic acid in the used liquid, which is for the first time only fresh water and in the following batches the reused water (steeping liquid) of the acidulated batches before (storaged in another vessel). So this steeping liquid is a so called “mother-liquid” which contents some lactic acid an lactic bacterias (lactobacilli) of the former batch(es) of acidulated malt). In this time the natural lactobacilli located on the malt surface are proliferating and formating lactic acid (classical fermentation). After draining the liquid (into the storage vessel) the malt is kilned again very carefully at 60° -65° C (140°- 149°F). This ready acidulated malt has got a lactic acid content of 3-4%.

You can use the storaged liquid (“mother-liquid”) a few times, depending on the condition (colour, smell, taste) of this liquid and the frequency of acidulated batches. Then you have to start again with fresh water and a related longer re-steeping time.

I hope this will support you. Don´t hesistate to ask for any further information."
- The best do the basics better -
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Ancient Abbey
German Brewing
Posts: 1163
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 8:23 pm

Re: Making Sauermalt

Postby Ancient Abbey » Mon Oct 24, 2016 7:34 am

Follow up questions:
"If I may ask, do you save back some of the "mother-liquid" to inoculate new batches?

Also, do the lactobacillus and other microbes survive the drying process afterwards?"


Follow up responses:
"yes we store the mother liquid to inoculate new batches. But only for a few times before we reject it and prepare a new mother liquid.

Yes, a small amount of the adhesive lactobacillus survive the kilning.
I hope this will support you. Don´t hesistate to ask for any further information."
- The best do the basics better -

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