Lodo beers to dry

Brewing water, and water profiles

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bjanat
Apprentice Brewer
Posts: 135
Joined: Mon Apr 25, 2016 7:28 pm

Re: Lodo beers to dry

Postby bjanat » Wed Jul 06, 2016 4:08 am

Natebriscoe wrote:Guess this would explain why when a big brewery gives a recipe out for an ipa and it has 10% crystal, but at the home level 10% would be crazy. Till now

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Right, like Arrogant Bastard with 10% Special B. Would be fun to try a Lodo lager version. Cold Bastard?


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Natebriscoe
Assistant Brewer
Posts: 264
Joined: Mon Apr 25, 2016 10:57 pm

Re: Lodo beers to dry

Postby Natebriscoe » Wed Jul 06, 2016 11:24 pm

I am starting to wonder if my lodo beers may take a bit longer to settle and clear than non lodo. As time goes by there seems to be a improvement, just longer than normal.

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Natebriscoe
Assistant Brewer
Posts: 264
Joined: Mon Apr 25, 2016 10:57 pm

Re: RE: Re: Lodo beers to dry

Postby Natebriscoe » Sat Jul 09, 2016 1:46 pm

Techbrau wrote:It is not straightforward to predict how much sulfate is being produced by the oxidation of sulfur compounds from SMB. It will vary considerably from system to system.

1 ppm sulfite, when fully oxidized, will actually contribute 1.2 ppm sulfate because each sulfite molecule gains the mass of one oxygen atom when it forms sulfate. SMB contributes both sulfite and sulfur dioxide to the mash, and 1 ppm sulfur dioxide, when oxidized, will contribute approx 1.5 ppm sulfate. However, the sulfur compounds are eliminated in other ways (such as boiling off, reacting with other molecules like chloramines, or even being a nutrient for yeast) so not every sulfite molecule you add will get oxidized into a sulfate molecule. It's also not easy to know whether the majority of the oxygen scavenging will be done by the sulfite or sulfur dioxide.

If you are very curious, I would suggest buying some sulfate test strips from amazon. You can use these to test the final concentration of sulfate in your wort/beer.

We tried to make the process in the paper as one-size-fits-all and foolproof as possible, but the truth is that LODO brewing is all about optimizing your own system. As you tighten it up by doing things like adding a mash cap, removing all leaks from your recirculation line, doughing-in from below, etc. you will be able to reduce your SMB dose to 50 mg/l or less.

Do you know what the sulfate concentration of your source water is? Even with RO water, I'd suggest against using gypsum when using a 100 mg/l SMB dose. If you're adding gypsum in addition to SMB, or if your source water already has a high sulfate concentration, I can easily see how 100 mg/l SMB would push you over the edge.

All of that said, I'm not certain whether the "dryness" you are speaking of is coming from an excess of sulfate. The malt character of non-LODO beer comes across to me as harshly bitter and cloyingly sweet at the same time. Lodo beer lacks both of these characteristics, and I can see how a straight up pilsner malt LODO beer could come across as very dry. What kind of recipe are you using? Have you considered adding 3-5% caramel malt in the grist, and/or some Munich or Vienna malt?

There is some really great info in your post. Thanks. I don't think I could have found this kind of clarification searching the Internet. Though I don't think there may be much of a problem other than lagering time and recipe adjustment. (And some styles may be better with that extra sweet malt character)

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