How are most people here measuring their fermetation temperature?

How are you fermenting?

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Nick_D
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Re: How are most people here measuring their fermetation temperature?

Postby Nick_D » Mon Oct 17, 2016 11:45 am

Bryan R wrote:Image

Damn, that looks space age :mrgreen:

How far does the thermowell go in ?
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Re: How are most people here measuring their fermetation temperature?

Postby Bryan R » Mon Oct 17, 2016 12:04 pm

Almost half way. Its controlled by a brewpi. It uses a small hair dryer on low for heat. Accurate to .1F.
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Nick_D
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Re: How are most people here measuring their fermetation temperature?

Postby Nick_D » Tue Oct 18, 2016 12:54 pm

Weizenberg wrote:My new aeration and propagation setup. Had the fermentser for a while, but being able to recirculate in the fermenter via a venturi tube helps immensely.

IMG_1172.JPG

I'm also beginning to use that fermenter for propagating yeast. It's ideal since I can easily oxygenate and keep it on the move, with the added bonus of complete temperature control at the same time.

IMG_1173.JPG


At the risk of side tracking my own thread here, briefly speaking, what is your propagation method with this? Constant aeration/oxygenation of wort at controlled temp (what temp?) ?, circulation being provided by the venturi set up? Do you crash the yeast out at all, or just turn the 02 off and let the yeast settle, and take that ?

My own recent method, which may have been unhelpful among other things, was to run filtered air through the wort at room temp for 2-3 days, then crash to 2C and pour off the liquid.
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Weizenberg
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Re: How are most people here measuring their fermetation temperature?

Postby Weizenberg » Tue Oct 18, 2016 1:03 pm

Crashing yeast is dangerous when it's in mid-fermentation. It needs to have finished, then crashing is ok, otherwise one ends up with not-so-nice tasting excretions in the beer.

My old method was stir plates or simply let it stand and settle out. This improved method re-circulates the yeast continuously, thus acting a bit like a stir plate but hopefully with less shear.

It never receives a continuous flow of oxygen (especially pure O2 - It's dead easy to overshoot), but measured, occasional bursts.

Without measurement it all becomes wild guesswork.
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Nick_D
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Re: How are most people here measuring their fermetation temperature?

Postby Nick_D » Tue Oct 18, 2016 1:15 pm

Weizenberg wrote:Crashing yeast is dangerous when it's in mid-fermentation. It needs to have finished, then crashing is ok, otherwise one ends up with not-so-nice tasting excretions in the beer.

My old method was stir plates or simply let it stand and settle out. This improved method re-circulates the yeast continuously, thus acting a bit like a stir plate but hopefully with less shear.

It never receives a continuous flow of oxygen (especially pure O2 - It's dead easy to overshoot), but measured, occasional bursts.

Without measurement it all becomes wild guesswork.


I wonder if constant aeration for days, even with just normal air is undesirable. I know stir plates have a constant gas exchange, but not like running a bubbling tube non stop.

I am considering avoiding the propagation issue altogether, at least as an experiment, by using drauflassen on a fresh smack pack of yeast. Sadly my lab friend does not have access to a DO meter. I will have to wait a little while.

My current batch which is spunding at 15C (classic accelerated) gave up 2X the amount of yeast sediment compared to the previous batch that did not have yeast nutrient. So that is a small victory.
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Re: How are most people here measuring their fermetation temperature?

Postby Ancient Abbey » Wed Oct 19, 2016 9:34 am

Even with drauflassen, the yeast will need oxygen in each subsequent wort addition. They more a yeast cell buds and the older it gets, the more critical it is to get it back to healthy using oxygen.
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Re: How are most people here measuring their fermetation temperature?

Postby Weizenberg » Wed Oct 19, 2016 9:55 am

Drauflassen isn't such a great technique either, as far as quality is concened. Narziss mentions no more than 3 batches as max. Modern methods don't aerate the last batch any more.

As a matter of fact oxygen control during Drauflassen can be a bit of a Pandora's box. You certainly need to measure well and often when doing this.

I'd keep it simple and aim for a straightforward brew which no premature optimisations or fancy techniques.

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Re: How are most people here measuring their fermetation temperature?

Postby Nick_D » Wed Oct 19, 2016 12:08 pm

Ancient Abbey wrote:Even with drauflassen, the yeast will need oxygen in each subsequent wort addition. They more a yeast cell buds and the older it gets, the more critical it is to get it back to healthy using oxygen.


Weizenberg wrote:Drauflassen isn't such a great technique either, as far as quality is concened. Narziss mentions no more than 3 batches as max. Modern methods don't aerate the last batch any more.

As a matter of fact oxygen control during Drauflassen can be a bit of a Pandora's box. You certainly need to measure well and often when doing this.

I'd keep it simple and aim for a straightforward brew which no premature optimisations or fancy techniques.

Solid foundation is everything.


Hmmm, thanks for the feedback on that idea. Thought maybe I could circumvent any yeast health issues I might be creating with my own starters. Perhaps so, but then with the added issues you both mention.

On a side note. I've had somewhat of an epiphany, the value of which you might be able to decide. All of my issues have come post transfer to spunding. If I am seating my keg lid with too much pressure (say, 10 psi @ 6C), could that be inhibiting my yeast performance ? is there such a thing a 'pressure shock' or even the sudden increased saturation of CO2 in the wort creating unhappy yeast ? I imagine most people are seating their lids with the minimum required, and letting the pressure build slowly. I've been 'heavy handed' out of paranoia of my lid not sealing.

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