Ayinger

For discussion of German breweries, reviews of their beer,
tasting notes, impressions, their brewing processes (distribution to the US, decoction
mashing, recipes, flavor notes, etc).

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Ancient Abbey
German Brewing
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Ayinger

Postby Ancient Abbey » Tue Mar 15, 2016 11:28 pm

Good tidbit from AJK...

ajk wrote:
Bryan R wrote:Rumor has it, Ayinger only decocts their Wheat beers.


I took a specially arranged tour of Ayinger in 2013, and the guide said they no longer do decoction. (Maybe they still do for their wheat beers and he neglected to mention it.) He said they do a 3-5 hour step mash.

Off topic, he said they do three charges of yeast for their lagers. The second comes a few days after the first, adding it at the top of the tank and letting it fall. The third comes at lagering time (also added at the top) and is a different strain!

Sorry, I know I'm new posting to this group—hope it's not all common knowledge or obvious. I just can't resist talking about this stuff.
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doctorjames
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Re: Ayinger

Postby doctorjames » Mon May 16, 2016 7:54 am

I also did a specially arranged "technical" tour of Aying and the guide explained that nowadays decoctions are only used in the dark beers.

Another interesting tidbit was that they heat treat the wheat beers at 60°C to improve stability and "stop undesirable processes in the bottle while not breaking down the yeast". The wheat beers are centrifuged whereas everything else goes through the kieselguhr filter.
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Brandon
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Re: Ayinger

Postby Brandon » Mon May 16, 2016 8:59 pm

doctorjames wrote:I also did a specially arranged "technical" tour of Aying and the guide explained that nowadays decoctions are only used in the dark beers.

Another interesting tidbit was that they heat treat the wheat beers at 60°C to improve stability and "stop undesirable processes in the bottle while not breaking down the yeast". The wheat beers are centrifuged whereas everything else goes through the kieselguhr filter.


How does one get one of these specially arranged tours? I got the German languate-only standard tour. Which, in and of itself was mindblowing. Especially the lagering room tasting, then tasting room.
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doctorjames
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Re: Ayinger

Postby doctorjames » Tue May 17, 2016 1:04 pm

Brandon wrote:How does one get one of these specially arranged tours? I got the German languate-only standard tour. Which, in and of itself was mindblowing. Especially the lagering room tasting, then tasting room.


I was lucky enough to be visiting Munich with a sizeable group of professional brewers so we had a tour to ourselves. It was arranged well in advance, and Aying were told about the participants' backgrounds and asked if they could provide a tour guide that could answer technical questions in English (which he did very well!).

Our tasting of the tanks was certainly sulphurous — almost unrecognisable at that stage compared to the finished versions. Very interesting.

Our guide was also showing off for the benefit of the brewers in the group (with rather less technically advanced brewery systems) about how the the brewing process was fully automated, including tank transfers and CIP, and how the brewers could go home for lunch and if any of the process parameters were out of spec it would send an SMS to the brewer and they could log in remotely and decide if they needed to return.

Another interesting technical point was they had two wells down to different aquifers which had different water profiles and hence they could blend a variety of water profiles without needing additives which he implied were not Reinheitsgebot compliant (the details of which seems a rather unnecessarily complex and confused topic http://barclayperkins.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/german-brewing-waters.html).

Sadly, information about yeast was not something that they could discuss in any detail and hence we didn't see the labs. They did have a flotation tank, however (for removing cold break and aeration before the beer was transferred into the fermenter).

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