Schmitz method for Wob

Infusion, Decoction, Step, etc

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Das alte
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Schmitz method for Wob

Postby Das alte » Wed May 18, 2016 8:12 pm

Wob.
Finally, I found the journal on the Schmitz method for producing Bavarian Lager and Boh. Pils.
Modern malt was used by the brewmaster. The journal was written in 1906. I thought that I read about the method in a journal written in 1896 or 98. What I have written, except for the last paragraph, is word for word and number for number taken from the journal.

Producing Bavarian Lager.
Dough in modern malt using 5 l/K. Rest mash one hour 28 C.
Drain tun and boil entire volume of mash for 20 minutes. Cool mash to 40 C and add mash liquid, rest for 10 minutes. Hold mash at 40 C.
Drain tun and boil entire volume of mash for 20 minutes. Cool mash to 50 C and add mash liquid, rest for 10 minutes. Hold mash at 50 C.
Drain tun and boil entire volume of mash for 10 minutes. Cool mash to 60 C and add mash liquid, rest for 20 minutes. Hold mash at 60 C.
Drain tun and boil entire volume of mash for 20 minutes. Cool mash to 65 C and add mash liquid, rest for 20 minutes. Hold mash at 65 C.
Lauter.
Higher attenuation will result during principle fermentation.
Secondary fermentation lasting two weeks.
Reduce temperature to 0 C for one month. Albuminoids will not be present.
There is no after fermentation with this method. Carbonation induced before packaging.
Good quality lasting three months from packaging when refrigerated.

Producing Boh. Pils.
Dough in modern malt at 13 C and rest mash for one hour.
Follow instructions for Lager. Add following cycles.
After 65 C rest. Drain tun and boil entire volume of mash for 20 minutes. Cool mash to 67 C and add mash liquid, rest for 20 minutes. Hold mash at 67 C.
Drain tun and boil entire volume of mash for 10 minutes. Cool mash to 70 C and rest for 10 minutes. Hold mash at 70 C.
Lauter.
Lower attenuation will result during principle fermentation.
Secondary fermentation lasting two weeks.
Reduce temperature to 0 C for one month.
Transfer beer and raise temperature to 5 C.
After fermentation will induce carbonation.
Test carbonation after two months and package.
Good quality lasting six months from packaging when refrigerated.

Due to the amount of work, heating and cooling energy expended, and the time involved, the method fell from favor. The brewery returned to using tri-decoction method after discovering that modern malt worked just as well and produced similar results with tri-decoction. Using the original Schmitz process five temperatures were used for producing Lager and eight for producing Pils. In tri-decoction method, eight and sometimes nine temperatures are used, four in the decoctions and four or five in the mash tun for producing Lager and Pils. Mash out is not included. The name of the brewmaster that wrote the journal was Joaquin Schmitz. Coincidence? Perhaps.
wobdee
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Re: Schmitz method for Wob

Postby wobdee » Wed May 18, 2016 9:20 pm

That's pretty cool, thanks for sharing. Looks like a lot of work but would be fun to try if one could find some true under modified malt. When I was doing my so called Schmitz I only did one boil, I could see trying this with 3 boils with rests at 62c, 72 and mashout using modern malt. I haven't done this in awhile since I bought a Braumeister system but still have my old equipment if I get the urge.

I remember you talking about another decoction schedule you were thinking of trying, something about splitting up the mash and adding them back together later? Did you ever try that?
wobdee
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Re: Schmitz method for Wob

Postby wobdee » Thu May 19, 2016 9:04 am

I could also see where this method of transferring the liquid instead of the mash could be easier to keep oxidation down as far as decoctions go.
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Ancient Abbey
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Re: Schmitz method for Wob

Postby Ancient Abbey » Thu May 19, 2016 9:36 am

I've been working with a local brewery to revive some late 1800's, early 1900's German-American recipes. It's been a lot of fun, and you can see how easily decoction mashes translated over to cereal mashing for working with local ingredients. I am of the opinion that many American styles are German recipes with local ingredients. Take helles, kolsch, pilsner, dunkel and bock, substitute 20-30% corn, and you have cream ale (both ale and lager versions), classic american pilsner, Kentucky Common and American Bock, respectively.
- The best do the basics better -
Das alte
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Re: Schmitz method for Wob

Postby Das alte » Thu May 19, 2016 3:17 pm

I would imagine that it would be easier to pump mash liquid than to transfer mash, unless the brewing system employed a mash auger. When breing I usually transfer about 7 to 10 gallons of mash per decoction. Volumes vary depending on grain bill and main mash temperature rise between rests. It is not too much work. I toyed with the idea of splitting mash put haven't moved on it. I still use a five kettle system and more equipment would be needed. About two weeks ago I ordered two 42 gallon conicals and that's as far as I am going for now. Early spring I submitted an application for a brewers license and when that arrives I am planning to increase capacity to five barrels.
The cream beer that I imbibed on was Genny Cream Ale. It was available during the early 70's and Pizza Hut was the only place that had it on draft in the area. I would go to Pizza Hut and drink a bunch of Genny and never order food. I really enjoyed the beer and was saddened when Genny ceased production. Later, Genny came out with 12 Horse Ale which wasn't too bad. Genny was on a downward spiral and the brewery was sold to Miller. I was shattered when Ballantine ceased producing IPA in the mid 80's. Ballantine IPA was used as the sounding board for producing IPA in the home brew world when I started brewing beer. Porter was Sam Smiths Toddy Porter, Ale was Bass, Pils was Pilsner Urquel, Stout was Guinness, they were our sounding boards. I guess that we had high expectations back then.
When I joined a home brew club there were only six of us. Being the new guy, the members asked me if I brew Ale, I said no, I brew Lager. Laughs and guffaws. Now, the thing is that we all used the same syrup and yeast and none of us knew anything about brewing. I asked the guys what they brewed and one guy said that he brewed Belgian sour beer. I new a little bit about Lambic and asked him if he brewed Lambic. Where I screwed up is in the way I pronounced the bic part of the word. I pronounced it like Bic lighter. The guy became all puffed up and pissed off and he said, "I beg your pardon, it is pronounced LamBEAK!" I smoke cigars and I use a Bic lighter to torch them. So, I pulled out my Bic lighter and asked him if I should call it a Beak lighter. Sometime later, I saw the guy rolling a wooden barrel down the driveway of a house three doors down from my place. I discovered that the lady that owned the house was his aunt. She was quite a gardener and she grew vegetables that she would give to neighbors. On one occasion she called me over to give me some produce. It was at that time that I noticed a wooden barrel next to the back porch and it had a gutter downspout stuck in it. She used the barrel to collect rain water to use for watering the garden. Being inquisitive I looked inside of the barrel and notice that there were hundreds of mosquito larvae swimming around slimy looking water. The barrel became the fermenter for the guy to brew Lambeak in. When he brought some of the stuff that he made to the meeting, I refused to drink the stuff. Later on, one of the members said that the stuff that he made would take chrome off a bumper.
wobdee
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Re: Schmitz method for Wob

Postby wobdee » Thu May 19, 2016 8:44 pm

I could never get into that Belgian stuff, especially the sours. I think it's the next big fad following the Craft beer IPA rage though.

So it sounds like you may be opening a small brewery? Keep us posted, I'd like to see some pics once you get it all set up. I take it your going to be brewing sours in some old rain barrels. :lol:
Das alte
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Re: Schmitz method for Wob

Postby Das alte » Fri May 20, 2016 4:25 pm

Wob, if you click on CitizensVoice, May 4 2014, you will find a picture of the brewing system that I own. The brewer who is stirring the decoction kettle is an excellent brewer. The brewer in the background brewed with me for the last 10 years. Recently, he entered the Happy Brewing Ground. The kettles in view are 20 and 30 gallon Blichmann boilers and a 10 gallon decoction kettle. Vessels out of view are the mash and lautertun, 15 and 20 gallon, respectively. Although, the system is five vessel, four burners are incorporated. When decoctions have been completed, the lautertun is placed upon the decoction burner. The hop back is out of the picture. Underneath the brew stand are three pumps and Blichmann chiller, all of which are attached to the legs of the table by means of split ring clamps and aluminum angle, everything is hard piped and tucked away. Stained oak hides everything from view. I have designed the system so that only switches have to be turned on and valves opened. Since that time I have revamped the system. I didn't lean out or improve the system, the system cannot become leaner, nor improved on. I have redesigned the system to look sleeker with the focus being on Art Deco.
We used Crisp Euro-pils that day. The stuff jelled up early and it was tough to work with the malt throughout the entire process. It was the first time that we used the malt. If I knew how the malt was going to reacted, I would have tossed in six row after the first decoction was dumped into the main mash. It was an instance when Mother Nature didn't care about books, nor numbers. She won't get me again, until next time.
It may be just my way of thinking, but when good beer turns sour, it is good beer gone haywire. LOL.
During the last couple of years I have been using Meussdoerffer sour malt. It is quite expensive, but the stuff surpasses everything that I have used, previously. If it is available in your Burg, try it. The kernels are very large and soft. Mash pH is pH, but what the grain adds to the final product is much different than what standard sour malt does for it. When added throughout decoctions, pH isn't "spikey." The kernels are as large as the kernels of Budvar grain.

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