Hefeweizen

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Ancient Abbey
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Hefeweizen

Postby Ancient Abbey » Sun Jul 10, 2016 6:04 pm

Doing a little research for my next hefe. I'm really happy with my amber hefe, but the pale hefe needs a little work.

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Brandon
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Brandon » Sun Jul 10, 2016 7:02 pm

Ancient Abbey wrote:Doing a little research for my next hefe. I'm really happy with my amber hefe, but the pale hefe needs a little work.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1468188223.834134.jpg

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1468188248.269482.jpg


I would love to hear your thoughts on these, then take a trip to Munich and drink it fresh and compare.
Bryan R
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Bryan R » Sun Jul 10, 2016 7:14 pm

I have such a love/hate thing for hefe's. I always crave them, so then I brew it. After about 6 glasses worth I am good, and the keg always get dumped to make room for something else. Big fan of the Ayinger.
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Feurhund
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Feurhund » Sun Jul 10, 2016 8:20 pm

I love Schneiderweisse Tap 7 and Aventinus.

I made my weizen label as a play off Schneider Weisse.

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Bilsch
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Bilsch » Sun Jul 10, 2016 9:19 pm

Very cool.
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Brody
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Brody » Sun Jul 10, 2016 10:35 pm

Bryan R wrote:I have such a love/hate thing for hefe's. I always crave them, so then I brew it. After about 6 glasses worth I am good, and the keg always get dumped to make room for something else. Big fan of the Ayinger.


I feel that. Not the best style to session over an evening but solid on occasion.
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Ancient Abbey
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Ancient Abbey » Sat Jul 16, 2016 7:11 pm

More research

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Smellyglove
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Smellyglove » Mon Feb 27, 2017 10:32 am

The first time I tasted a Hefeweizen (Paulaner), I had one of those few transcendal moments you get. It was something quite different, and absolutely stellar comparing to what I've been drinking up to that point in life.

So, I'm trying to nail a good Weizen. My reference is something like a Weihenstephaner and Paulaner, I have unfortunately never tasted the Ayinger. I'm mostly interested in the mashing.

Currently I'm doing a Herrmann-mash. Dough in at 43, then I raise the temp up to 62 (1c/min) I didn't hold the last one at protein temps, just to try, since I'm stepping though it with the mentioned rate. Then I do a 70C step.
Then repeat for the maltase-rest at 37, after maltase-rest, I add my water adjustments.. I'm quite confused about maltase and ferrulic acid temperatures, as different sources give different temperatures.

Would I be alright in doing 40C both times, instead of 43 and 37?
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Weizenberg
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Weizenberg » Tue Feb 28, 2017 2:54 am

I hate to be the harbinger of bad news, but what you describe is not quite the Hermann mash (i.e. maltase mash).

The beauty of this method is that one doughs in high and thus disables a noticeable amount of LOX already. You are then doing a normal conversion cycle until it passes the iodine test, then cool to 43C.

Now several things happen

1 - the addition of the second part of the malt permits the therein contained maltase to convert the previously made maltose into glucose.

2 - since this temperature is also an optimal range for the proteolytics, you are effectively running a combined protein rest.

3 - also being in the ferulic acid range, this is made as well.

Fermentation of Weizen is crucial (best is open with regular skimming).

One can alter the sucrose and protein content by adjusting the ratio of main to secondary grist. 50:50 or 60:40 are typical values..

Weizen is a surprisingly difficult style to brew. It requires quite a lot of dedication and an accomplished brew master. When made well it's an absolute delight and a real delicacy.
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Ancient Abbey
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Re: Hefeweizen

Postby Ancient Abbey » Tue Feb 28, 2017 9:31 am

Kunze has a nice section on the maltase mash and data on % change in glucose- 3.2.4.3.1 (5th ed)
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